Topics Summary

Let's assume, we have logged into a machine's terminal windows and want to check below details...

 

 

Uname is the major command to check the system information. This command can be used with many options.

 

Syntax:

Uname options

 

 

Example-1:

Checking the architecture of the system or machine:

Using the “-m” option with uname command we can figure out the system architecture.

Command execution and sample output is given below,

[root@sys1 ~]# uname -m

x86_64

 

Here, we have shown the command execution from root user but it can also be executed from normal user.

 

Note:

There is other command also to display the system architecture.

[root@sys1 ~]# arch

x86_64

 

 

Example-2:

Checking the type of Operating system:

Using “uname –s command” we will display the name of the OS.

[root@sys1 ~]# uname -s

Linux

 

 

Example-3:

Checking the kernel release of the system:

Using uname –r command we will check the release of the os.

[root@sys1 ~]# uname -r

2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64

 

 

Example-4:

Checking the system hostname information:

Using “uname –n” command we will check the host name of the system.

[root@sys1 ~]# uname -n

sys1.abclearn.com

 

 

Example-5:

Listing out all of the system information at once:

Uname –a is the command to check all the information of the system.

[root@sys1 ~]# uname -a

Linux sys1.abclearn.com 2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Tue Jun 29 11:47:41 EST 2016 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

 

“uname” is the command with “-a” option is used to display kernel and processor information of the system.

 

From the above output:
Linux (first column) à represents the operating system

Sys1.ithonours.com(second column) à represents the hostname given.

3.10.0-12 3.el7.x86_64(third column) à kernel version

Later on, represents date & time and last options explain the processor architecture.